Introduction to Mesothelioma

Introduction to Mesothelioma

Introduction to Mesothelioma What is Mesothelioma? The Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a type of rate cancer of the cells that develop the pleura, a thin protective bag that covers the lungs and lines with the chest wall. In about seventy percent of all mesothelioma patients, the disease develops in the pleural mesothelium or lung lining. In one-third of patients, it develops in the abdomen. Mesothelioma rarely occurs elsewhere, such as around the heart or in the reproductive organs. Mesothelioma is primarily a locally invasive cancer, but it may spread to distant organs late in the disease. Usually, only one side of the chest is involved with no preference for either side. Fewer than five percent of patients have the disease on both sides. Mesothelioma occurs in men with much greater frequency than in women. Mesothelioma is rare cancer, with approximately 3,000 new cases diagnosed yearly in the U.S. The time lag between exposure to asbestos and development of the disease ranges from 15 to 50 years. At the time most mesotheliomas are diagnosed, the pleural surface is studded with many small nodules. As time progresses, the nodules combine to form a continuous solid tumor that encases the lung, like the rind of an orange, interfering with breathing. Symptoms in patients with mesothelioma generally include shortness of breath, cough, chest pain, and weight loss. Potential Causes for Mesothelioma The association between mesothelioma and asbestos is well established. Approximately 80 percent of patients know that they have been exposed asbestos. People at high risk include those who have handled asbestos on the job, such as workers in mines, mills, or shipyards. The risk extends to those living in surrounding communities and to family members who may be exposed through contact with tools and clothing. The absence of an asbestos exposure in the remaining 20 percent of patients has prompted some experts to argue for a genetic predisposition. Even with known asbestos exposure, the estimated lifetime risk of developing mesothelioma is only 5-7 percent. This supports the theory that other environmental or genetic factors may be involved. Another associated risk factor is radiation. Radiation-induced malignant mesothelioma appears to have the same prognosis as asbestos-related mesothelioma. At present, there is no treatment for mesothelioma, but it depends on as early as it is examined and diagnosed and how rapidly it is treated. Prompt medical evaluation and immediate treatment can keep the patient to long-term survival or successful treatment of symptoms.

Types of Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma is a type of cancer which starts with the cause that when active and healthy cells change and their growth is out of control, which is caused forming a mass called a tumor. A tumor can be cancerous or benign. A cancerous tumor is malignant, meaning it can grow and spread to other parts of the body. A benign tumor means the tumor can grow but will not spread.

Frequency of Mesothelioma

Almost a ratio of 75% to 80% of mesotheliomas disease begins through the lining surrounding the lungs, namely pleural mesothelioma. Pleural mesothelioma begins in the chest cavity, but it does not start in the lungs. As such, it is often incorrectly grouped with lung cancer.

Mixed, or biphasic, type. Roundabout 10% to 20% of patients are diagnosed with disease mesothelioma with a mixed type. The term “mixed” or “biphasic” is meant that this type of cancer contains both epithelioid and sarcomatoid categories. Treatment does not work as well for this type when compared with the epithelioid type. However, treatment for this type often works better than for the sarcomatoid type.

Near about seventy percent of the overall mesothelioma patients, the disease grows in the pleural mesothelium or lung lining. Near about thirty percent of patients, it develops in the abdomen. Mesothelioma rarely occurs elsewhere, such as around the heart or in the reproductive organs.

Mesothelioma is rare cancer, with approximately 3,000 new cases diagnosed yearly in the U.S. The time lag between exposure to asbestos and development of the disease ranges from 15 to 50 years.

As time progresses, the nodules combine to form a continuous solid tumor that encases the lung, like the rind of an orange, interfering with breathing. Symptoms in patients with mesothelioma generally include shortness of breath, cough, chest pain, and weight loss.

The association between mesothelioma and asbestos is well established. Approximately 80 percent of patients know that they have been exposed asbestos. People at high risk include those who have handled asbestos on the job, such as workers in mines, mills, or shipyards. The risk extends to those living in surrounding communities and to family members who may be exposed through contact with tools and clothing.

Knowledge Center Introduction to Mesothelioma Diagnosing Mesothelioma Treating Mesothelioma SEARCH 2017 Day of Remembrance Why Patients Choose IMP Ask Our Doctors a Question Introduction to Mesothelioma What is Mesothelioma? The Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a disease which is the cancer of cells that grow the pleura, a thin protective bag that covers the lungs and lines the chest wall.  Mesothelioma rarely occurs elsewhere, such as around the heart or in the reproductive organs. Basically the Mesothelioma persistent cancer, but it may spread to distant organs late in the disease. Usually, only one side of the chest is involved with no preference for either side. Fewer than five percent of patients have the disease on both sides. The ratio of the Mesothelioma much greater than women. Mesothelioma is rare cancer, with approximately 3,000 new cases diagnosed yearly in the U.S. The time lag between exposure to asbestos and development of the disease ranges from 15 to 50 years. At the time most mesotheliomas are diagnosed, the pleural surface is studded with many small nodules. As time progresses, the nodules combine to form a continuous solid tumor that encases the lung, like the rind of an orange, interfering with breathing. Symptoms in patients with mesothelioma generally include shortness of breath, cough, chest pain, and weight loss. Potential Causes for Mesothelioma The association between mesothelioma and asbestos is well established. Approximately 80 percent of patients know that they have been exposed asbestos. People at high risk include those who have handled asbestos on the job, such as workers in mines, mills, or shipyards. The risk extends to those living in surrounding communities and to family members who may be exposed through contact with tools and clothing. The absence of an asbestos exposure in the remaining 20 percent of patients has prompted some experts to argue for a genetic predisposition. Even with known asbestos exposure, the estimated lifetime risk of developing mesothelioma is only 5-7 percent. This supports the theory that other environmental or genetic factors may be involved. Another associated risk factor is radiation. At present, the medical doesn’t have any treatment for mesothelioma, but it depends that how soon it was diagnosed and how rapidly it is treated. Prompt medical evaluation and aggressive treatment can lead to prolonged survival or successful treatment of symptoms.

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